Return to the Continuum home page

Clicking on images provides larger ones.

Tuesday, May 25, 2004

WITCHBLADE/WOLVERINE'S ERIC BASALDUA

Witchblade/Wolverine, a crossover written by Chris Claremont pairing the popular characters from Top Cow and Marvel, is scheduled for release on Wednesday. The Continuum caught up with artist Eric Basaldua at Wizard World Philadelphia over the weekend to talk about the project.

The Continuum: How was it working on this project?

Basaldua: It was a lot fun and a lot of pressure at the same time. Wolverine is an icon character and Wolverine has so many fans and I didn't want to disappoint them.

The Continuum: A lot of the first part of the story takes place in a limo?

Basaldua: Yeah, that was very hard because it was such a confined space and it was hard to make realistic movements in the drawing of people relaxing while they're sitting down. And they were drinking, so I had to make them kind of woozy, kind of tired. That's the hardest thing to draw, that kind of story telling.

The Continuum: It's not 22 pages of them in a limo, though.

Basaldua: No, it's about 6-7 pages in the limo. I was kind of surprised because there were only 22 pages and I was wondering how Chris was going to pull this off. He did a phenomenal job with the build-up and when the bad guy shows up.

The limo part was the hardest part, only because Image guys like to draw everything blown up and exploding and things like that. I learned a lot drawing that sequence, and I'm glad I did it. I think it worked really well in the book.

The Continuum: You get to cut loose eventually?

Basaldua: Yeah, towards the end of the book the bad guys show up and there was a good portion of action going on there. They start blasting away with machine guns and uzis.

I grew up loving the work of guys like Marc Silvestri and Jim Lee, and they're known for their dynamic action. So it was a lot of fun for me to do when Wolverine got to do his thing.

The Continuum: I understand this project was done with some difficult time constraints.

Basaldua: Yeah, I had to do almost 50 percent of the book in 12 days. I did 12 pages in 12 days because of I had some personal issues in my life and I really had to put the whole thing on hold. I didn't want to draw the book while I was having problems because it shows in the work.

So I had to draw the last 12 pages in 12 days. That kind of thing is kind of intense for a guy who's not that experienced. But I got it done a day early and I was pretty happy with it. I'm really proud of the way it came out because it doesn't look rushed. It was a good learning experience.

The Continuum: What do you have coming up next?

Basaldua: I'm working on three issues of Tomb Raider. It's supposed to be a prelude to a big, year-long event that we're going to have next year. And I'm very excited to be a part of that because there's going to be a lot of action and guest appearances.

The Continuum: So you're going from one icon to another.

Basaldua: Something like that. I didn't think of it that way.

The Continuum: Can you say anything about the story?

Basaldua: James Bonny is writing that. There's not much I can say about the story just yet because there are too many surprises in the story.

The newest anime and all the classics too @ TFAW!



E-mail the Continuum at RobAlls@aol.com



Return to the Continuum home page


Copyright © 2003, The Comics Continuum